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Thursday, May 31, 2012

Tips for Sharpening Your Writing Skills


MAKE USE OF THE 20 FIGURES OF SPEECH
(Thursdays, from May 24 to October 4)

2. Anaphora [uh-naf-er-uh]: The repetition of a word or expression at the beginning of successive phrases, clauses, sentences, or verses.

Purpose:
To dramatize an idea or theme
To build toward a climax for a strong emotional effect

Examples of anaphora:

We cannot dedicate—we cannot consecrate—we cannot hallow—this ground.” (Abraham Lincoln's “Gettysburg Address”)

"Of all the gin joints in all the towns in all the world, she walks into mine."
(Rick Blaine in Casablanca)

"I needed a drink, I needed life insurance, I needed a vacation, I needed a home in the country. What I had was a coat, a hat and a gun."
(Raymond Chandler, Farewell, My Lovely, 1940)

“We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender."
(Winston Churchill, speech to the House of Commons, June 4, 1940)

“To everything there is a season,
A time for every purpose under heaven:
A time to be born,
     And a time to die;
A time to plant,
     And a time to pluck what is planted;
A time to kill,
     And a time to heal;
A time to break down,
   And a time to build up . . .”
(Ecclesiastes 3:1-3, NKJV)

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was fond of anaphora.
"But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free.

One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination.

One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity.

One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land.

And so we've come here today to dramatize a shameful condition."

(“I have a Dream,” 1963)


FRIDAY: MORE ON PRONOUN ANTECEDENTS

1 comment:

  1. Interesting. I never knew their was a word for that technique.

    Thanks Steph!

    ReplyDelete

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